Testors airbrush disassembly and cleaning

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Skidmark
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Testors airbrush disassembly and cleaning

Post by Skidmark » Tue Sep 09, 2003 10:43 pm

OK - here we go. I will supply pics for each section, along with an explanation of each piece. I hope this comes across as simple, rather than complicated. Always be gentle! The brush contains small parts! If you aren't comfortable taking apart your brush, then don't! I do not want hate mail saying you broke your brush because of me! </covering my *censored*>

Image 1 - Before you do anything, be sure to take out the little black plug on the opposite side you connect your gravity/feed cup. If this plug is in, the brush will not come apart so easy.
Now, on the end you connect your air line, simply take your index finger and thumb, and gently pull apart the back part of the brush. It might be a bit tough at first, but you will get it to seperate. I also recommend on setting up an area (like on your couch) to where if it snaps apart quickly, you can catch the flying parts. Take it slow so this doesnt happen, but be prepared if it does.

Image

Image 2 - When you do get the housing seperated, you must lift the back (where you seperated the brush) to 90 degrees to remove that half of the housing. The housing has a lip on the edge that goes into the silver housing where you insert your tips, and around the the section you attach your paint cup.

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Image 3 - This shot shows the brush open faced. You can get an understanding (somewhat) of how the brush works. Here is the breakdown of the parts: The red part you see is the "diaphragm", the control knob is connected to the trigger, and the trigger is then connected to the white part of the brush which houses the needle. The diaphragm has two tubes connected to it, the clear is where the air goes in, the smaller blue tube goes into the needle housing. The white part above the blue tube is held on by a spring, which holds the needle. Be careful, the needle is rather small. Go ahead and move the trigger back and forth, push down on the trigger, and move the control knob back and forth so you get an idea of what the brush actually does.

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Image 4 - To remove the guts of the brush, push out the air line connector, and you can then remove most of the parts.

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Image 5 - Taking apart the parts (lol) - Ok. This part you have to pay attention to remember how it went back together. The air lines and diaphragm are completely seperate from the trigger assembly, so remove that first. Next, gently lift up on the control knob, and unsnap it from the trigger. The trigger is next. The two arms on the front and back of the trigger have prongs that connect it to the trigger, and the needle housing. I would recommend removing the trigger and long arm from the short arm and needle housing. Next, remove the other half of the brush housing, leaving you the needle housing with the short arm in your hand.

Take a look at what you have and see how it works. Take your finger and hold it over the top part of the white part, so it does not come off, and gently pull back on the short arm while holding the housing in the other. You can see that when you pull back on the arm, the white part gets pulled back along with the needle (The needle base is that pale blue part the arrow is pointing to.)

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Image 6 - Remove the small arm (its pronged like the long arm). You will notice the prongs go over the white part and attach to the needle. Now, gently push up on the white part so you can remove the needle. The spring will hold onto the white part, so you do not have to worry about losing it. All you have to do now is grab the needle and remove it. Take a close look at it, you will probably notice the needle is gunked up at the neck of the base.

Image

Image 7 - Part breakdown:
1 - Brush housing
2 - Control knob and slide
3 - Needle housing, and tip housing
4 - Needle holder
5 - Needle
6 - Trigger assembly
7 - Inlet air tube
8 - Outlet air tube
9 - Diaphragm

Image

One thing you will probably notice that I changed on the brush was the length of the inlet air tube. Testors has it wrap around too many of the brush housing pegs, so I shortened it and ran it down the bottom of the brush. This is up to you, but I found it to be a pain when putting the brush back together - it seemed the tube kept hanging up on one of the pegs everytime. If you are snapping the brush housing back together, and it doesnt want to close, dont force it! The inlet tube probably got caught on the peg. If you force it, you might cut into the inlet tube, which obviously isnt a good thing!

Now for the cleaning. I highly recommend using lacquer thinner, for it will take off water base as well as the lacquer base paint residue. Get the gunk off the bottom of the needle, and take a q-tip and hit where the needle slides into the housing. Clean off any other paint residue you see anywhere else, and start to put your brush back together.

By far, the hardest part is getting the white needle holder to stay in place while you are connecting the small arm of the trigger assembly. My best advice is to line up the lip of the needle housing to the indentation of the needle holder, and hold it in place with your finger. Once you have the small arm attached, put on one of the brush housing halves. Again, this is the MOST difficult part of putting the brush back together. Be patient, be careful, and take your time. Put the trigger assembly back together, and attach the control knob and set it in its proper grooves. Hook the inlet and outlet air tubes to the diaphram, and slide it under the trigger assembly, and place it in its proper grooves. All that is left is to put the other half of the brush housing on, and snap it back together. Walla!! Once you get the hang of taking this brush apart, it gets easier everytime.

Good luck and happy painting!

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SLEA
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Post by SLEA » Thu Dec 18, 2003 12:29 am

I haven't been around the forums in a while but I see your still as helpful as ever, I commend you for having talent and being willing to share any and all knowledge. You're an A++ guy in my book.

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CRSMP5
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Post by CRSMP5 » Thu Dec 18, 2003 10:04 am

yea he is... :D

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Post by CRSMP5 » Sun Aug 01, 2004 9:43 pm

i finally bought the identical one like posted above.. how could i pass it up for 70$.. wooden case and all..

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