Primer on electrics for Nitro Heads! Also: Why Electric?

This forum is dedicated to discussion regarding the HPI Savage Flux HP Brushless Electric Vehicle.

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
KiZ
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 5404
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:00 am
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Primer on electrics for Nitro Heads! Also: Why Electric?

Post by KiZ » Fri Jan 02, 2009 2:26 pm

So many people are interested in the upcoming Flux now, but I know a lot of you are new to electric. I remember back when I started out in electrics I was totally lost. So here is a primer with most of what you need to know regarding batteries and brushless power systems.

This article will focus primarily on Brushless and LiPo technologies, as these are the most common techs people use for 1/8th scale electric. I will add information pertaining to the use and charging of NiMH packs soon.

Why would I want an electric?
Did I just hear you say electrics are for kids?! I don't know about you but I wouldn't give my kids this to play with:
[youtube]
[/youtube]
Now, if that didn't convince you, maybe this will:
(GRAPH REMOVED)
(EV = electric vehicle, ICE = internal combustion engine)
Look at the light blue line. That's right. Instant torque starting from 1RPM, and a power curve to die for.
This, gentlemen is why electric is not just for kids. :twisted:

Advantages of electric
  • No dirty oil/nitro
  • No glow plugs
  • No glow ignitor
  • No buying & carting around expensive fuel
  • No tuning the engine
  • No separate receiver battery
  • One less servo to go wrong
  • No need to start the engine
  • Fairly quiet - suitable for neighbourhoods or night running
  • Less maintenance
Disadvantages of electric
  • Expensive! - charging equipment and batteries alone will cost you ~$500 for high quality products.
  • You can only run if you have extra charged batteries. No carrying around a tank of fuel that lasts a whole day.
If you can think of more, please reply with them! (I'm not trying to be biased)
[hr]

PRIMER! Lets get started.

[align=center]Batteries[/align]

Chemistries
There are several different chemistries of battery that are used today in RC.
  • NiCd - Nickel Cadmium. Old school, not used so much any more, we won't concentrate on this.
  • NiMH - Nickel Metal Hydride. Very popular in a lot of applications. The hump pack in your savage is most likely NiMH. NiMH cells are reasonably safe and offer good performance, whilst having little memory. Nominal cell voltage is 1.2v.
  • LiPo - Lithium Polymer. The popularity of this battery has exploded in the RC world lately. Good LiPos offer extreme performance whilst saving weight, and being a nice square cornered form factor. The downside is they are DANGEROUS if not handled properly. More on safety later. The majority of this article will focus on LiPos. Nominal cell voltage is 3.7v.
  • LiMn - Lithium Manganese. Very similar to LiPo, but a lot safer. The penalty for this is that they weigh more for the same capacity. Not nearly as popular as LiPo. Nominal cell voltage is 3.7v.
  • A123 - Lithium Ion. A123 batteries are a new contender on the scene. The form factor is like large NiMH cells, meaning they are tricky to fit in most trucks or cars. Aircraft owners however are finding great use for these new cells. Nominal cell voltage is 3.3v.
A couple of terms
I'll use the analogy of water travelling through a hose for these terms.

Current
This is the amount of electricity travelling through a wire or battery at any given time. Kind of like the difference in between having a fat hose and a thin one. Measured in Amps (A)

Voltage
This is the "punch" that the electricity has. Kind of like the pressure in that hose. 12v might be like a faucet, 120v might be like a pressure washer! Measured in Volts (V)

Both Voltage AND Current have a bearing on the power your truck will have, and it is a very simple relation:
Current is linearly related to Torque (more current, more torque!)
Voltage is linearly related to RPM (more voltage, faster it goes!)

Battery Specifications

Capacity
Like the fuel tank on your savage, the capacity of a battery determines how long it can run your truck for. Capacity is measured in a term Amp-Hours (Ah). This means how many hours the battery can output 1 Amp of current for. For example, a 4Ah battery could power a source sucking 2 Amps for 2 straight hours.
Often capacity is measured in mAh (milliamp-hours). a 4Ah battery is the same as a 4000mAh battery.
You will most likely be able to fit around 5000mAh batteries in the flux battery boxes, although I cannot confirm this yet.

Voltage
This has the biggest bearing on how fast your motor will run. To give you an example, most 10th scale electric cars use somewhere in the region from 7.2v to 11.1v (depending on the chemistry of the battery and other factors). 8th scale cars and trucks may use anywhere from 14.4v to 22.2v.
When people talk about LiPo battery packs, they don't usually talk about the actual voltage, instead they say "3S", "4S" etc. I will elaborate on the terminology of lipo packs later, but in short this is the same as voltage. A 3S pack is a pack of 3 serial cells, meaning it has 3 x 3.7v cells linked together, adding up to 11.1v. 4S has 14.4v, etc.
You will find in a truck like a savage, 4S, 5S or 6S are all suitable voltages.
For those of you wanting raging beasts... 6S (22.2v) is your voltage!

Discharge
The final specification of a battery pack is the discharge, measured by something called "C rating". This is how much juice the pack can deliver at any specific time - a bit like how much fuel a fuel system can deliver at once in a car.
For example a 30C pack with a capacity of 4 Ah (4000mAh) could deliver 4 * 30 = 120A at once.
Packs generally have "constant" discharge ratings and "burst" discharge ratings. The burst rating is what the pack can deliver in short bursts, for example to aid in acceleration, but it can not maintain this current for long.
So what happens when your discharge is not good enough? Generally the motor system will "cog", during acceleration, which is where it stutters and hesitates, a bit like a car running out of gas. Cogging is a sign that your battery is not up to the task!
Look for batteries with a constant rating of 20-30C if possible. The higher the better.

Lithium pack terminology
You may find some packs referred to with the numbers and the letters "S" and "P". For example a 3S pack, a 4P pack, or perhaps a 2S2P pack.
"S" stands for Serial. When cells are stacked in a serial configuration, their voltage adds up. For example a 2S pack is 2 3.7v cells in serial, adding up to 7.4v total. The capacity remains the same as each individual cell.
"P" stands for parallel. When cells are stacked in a parallel configuration, their capacity adds up. For example a 4000mAh 2P pack would create a 3.7v 8000mAh pack.
The terms can be combined, so for example a 2S2P pack is 2 packs of 2 serial cells stacked in parallel. So if using 4000mAh cells, a 2S2P pack would afford you 7.4v at 8000mAh!

Running multiple packs in one vehicle
Some vehicles take a single pack (like the FLM savage brushless conversion). Using a single 4S/5S/6S pack in these is suitable. Other vehicles like the Flux, e-maxx, e-revo, e-savage have two battery compartments. Having two compartments is better for balance and usually can accomodate a higher overall capacity.
In the Flux, if you wanted to run a 5000mAh 6S pack, you would need to divide it up between the packs. So for example you would run two 5000mAh 3S packs - one in each battery box. The Flux is pre-wired to accept two packs like this. It combines them in the same way as mentioned in the section above. These two separate 3S packs essentially become one 6S pack.

Keeping your pack in good health
LiPo cells will be damaged and die if they fall below a certain voltage. The safety level is 3v per cell. Most good ESCs have built in devices called LVCs (Low voltage cut-off). This stops the truck when the voltage falls to this critical level, letting you know it's time to stop or recharge the pack. If you were to run a LiPo with no LVC until the battery died, it would really be dead - no recharging would bring it back (and would be indeed hazardous).
The flux's RTR ESC has an LVC, so no need to worry about that. You must however, make sure the LVC is set correctly in the settings to match the battery. a 6S battery needs the LVC set to 18v (6 * 3v).

Storing
Don't leave LiPo packs in your truck. Always remove them and store them in a safe fireproof place. I use a small metal lock box. They only cost a few dollars and will keep your batteries safe. The added bonus is you can lock the box to stop any young children you may have from playing with them.
If you won't be using your pack for a long time, charge it half way, so the voltage does not drop naturally below the critical level mentioned above.
This is my lockbox, to give you an idea.
ImageImage
Similar containers like ammo boxes are equally useful.

Dangers of Lithium Chemistries
LiPo and other lithium chemistries have a lot of power stored inside them. Unfortunately this power can be released in the form of fire. LiPo packs are delicate and should be handled with care. A punctured cell can very quickly catch fire and will quickly turn the pack in to a raging fireball. One of the biggest dangers comes from improper charging. I speak below about proper charging practices. NEVER exceed the stated charging rate/voltage. NEVER let the pack become overcharged. NEVER leave a pack unattended on charge. ALWAYS store your packs in a fireproof container. I want to make myself very clear on this, because people have lost homes due to lithium packs. You don't want your savage, car or home to look like this:
Image Image Image
(These are all real results of LiPo accidents)

This is a video of an over-charged LiPo:
[youtube]
[/youtube]

Now that I've scared you a little - don't be scared away! LiPos are perfectly safe as long as you treat them with respect, charge them correctly and store them safely.
[hr]

[align=center]Charging[/align]

To charge LiPo, you need a specifically designed LiPo charger. You cannot charge them with any old charger, and doing so is very dangerous.

Rates

Current
So what current do you charge LiPos at? [s]There is only one answer to this. ALWAYS 1C or lower.[/s] Times have changed and whilst it used to only be safe to charge your packs at 1C, many packs accept higher charge rates, for example 2C or 3C. The battery should state on it. If in doubt ALWAYS revert to 1C. This "1C" is relative to the pack you have, so the current will be dependent on the capacity of pack you own.
This means if you have a 4000mAh (remember, 4Ah) pack, you must charge at 4A. If you have a 6000mAh pack, charge at 6A. If you have a 6250mAh pack, charge at 6.25A.
If your charger cannot charge at the exact current you need, set it to the next lowest. Never higher. So with a 6250mAh pack, if your charger can do 1, 4 or 8A, you would want to charge that pack at 4A.

Voltage
The charger will require knowing what voltage your pack is. Simply make sure it is set to the same voltage as your pack. Typically chargers will refer to the voltage as cell count, like I mentioned above - 2S, 3S, 4S, etc.

Charging the pack
When charging, check your pack, make sure you know what the specifications are. Set the charger. Check the specs again and make sure the settings match. Double check. Triple check. Thankfully most good chargers these days come with safety features which make it hard to accidentally overcharge or charge on the wrong voltage. But this is no reason not to triple check your settings before starting a charge.
Don't leave the pack unattended whilst charging. It is recommended to also charge it in a fireproof place - a stone counter or a ceramic surface of some kind would be ideal. Several shops sell something called a Lipo Sack which is a fireproof bag you can place the battery in whilst charging, to drastically reduce any chance of an accident burning your house down.
Personally I use a small metal lock box to store and charge my LiPos. And importantly, I never leave them unattended. If you need to leave to go and do something, ask a family member to keep an eye on it, or stop the charge.

Balancing
Because of the sensitivity of cells to voltage drops (mentioned above in the health section), they must be kept in line with each other's voltage. This is achieved by "balancing" the pack. This is done with a device similar to a charger called a balancer. Some LiPo chargers have balancers built in, and some balancers are devices in their own right. The battery has a special connector called a balance tap/balance connector. You simply plug it in to the balancer and wait till the balancer tells you it is finished. This should be done periodically, preferably after a full charge.
The tricky part is that there are several brands of balancer connectors. Hyperion/Apache/Method taps are the most common, and for that reason I recommend you order batteries with those taps if you are unsure.
[hr]

[align=center]Brushless Power Systems[/align]

Why Brushless?
Brushless motors are a revolution in electric motor technology. They only have one moving part and no mechanical contact anywhere apart from the bearings. This makes them extremely efficient and reliable. They need zero maintenance (apart from replacing worn bearings). This is a far cry from the older hot mod brushed motors where brushes and commutators frequently wore out and needed replacing or re-cutting.

Brushless motors require Brushless specific ESCs. Regular ESCs will not work.
(ESC stands for Electronic Speed Controller, and is the brain and power provider for the motor)

Sensored and unsensored systems
There are two main types of brushless motor - sensored and unsensored. Sensored systems have dedicated sensors to detect what position the rotor is at and use this information can make the spinning of the motor much smoother at low RPMs. Unsensored systems infer the rotor position based on something called back emf, which is less precise.
Most systems are unsensored, as it is fairly unnecessary and adds expense. A good ESC can run a unsensored motor very smoothly. The standard RTR system on the Flux is unsensored.

Specifications

ESC - Continuous Current
This is the maximum current the controller can handle. The current that flows through the ESC is determined by what the motor demands at that situation. Acceleration is the hardest on the ESC - it draws the most current at once. If the motor demands more current then the ESC can handle, and the battery is capable of providing that much current (discharge rating on the battery), the ESC will simply go "pop", you'll see little dollar signs floating out of your truck, and have an expensive paperweight.
With the Flux, you have little reason to worry. The RTR ESC is rated for 120A continuous (and significantly more for burst periods), which is more than enough for the demands of a 1/8th scale truck.

Motor - Kv
Brushless motors are rated by something called Kv. This is a simple term which means the number of RPM the motor can do per volt applied to it. So for example, a 2200Kv motor on a 6S pack (22.2v) would spin at 48,840rpm.
Higher Kv motors spin faster and use more power, and generally lower Kv motors have more torque.
The stock Flux comes with a 2200Kv motor.


Miscellaneous

Powering your receiver
An advantage of electric powered cars is the fact you can forget about receiver packs. No need for a hump pack any more, because the main battery can power your receiver. This is done through the ESC, by a device called a BEC (Battery Eliminator Circuit). The wire that runs from the ESC to the throttle out on the RX not only gets the throttle position from the RX, but it doubles by powering it. So you don't need to plug anything in to the power port on your receiver.



Hope this helps anyone out, I know it's kinda of daunting for those who have never touched electric before, but I assure you that its easy to get to grips with. Brushless is an exploding market and will get very big in the next few years, so if even if you aren't sure about electrics, I suggest you try one! It might just change your mind.

I'm pretty exhausted after writing all this, so I'm sure there is stuff I have got wrong/typo'd/missed out. Please reply with whatever and I'll update the thread with it.

KiZ out.
Last edited by KiZ on Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:43 pm, edited 11 times in total.
[url=http://www.kizzard.net/gallery/][img]http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r56/kizzzard/gray-sav.gif[/img][/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
xtremesavage
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 7267
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: BUCKEYE STATE

Post by xtremesavage » Fri Jan 02, 2009 2:34 pm

good job kiz this was a great write up, and well needed.
[img]http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n403/xtremesavage/newsig.png[/img]
Share knowlegde,,,Dont brag!!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
88gtanotchback
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 1262
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:00 pm

Post by 88gtanotchback » Fri Jan 02, 2009 2:42 pm

wow thanks alot for the write up kiz.  tons of excellent information i never knew.  I really appreciate you taking time to do this awesome write up.  question for you tho.  whats the life span of a properly treated Lipo battery?  being that they can be costly to replace i was curious as to what you could expect a lipo to last?

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
savagexldude
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 824
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: Netherlands

Post by savagexldude » Fri Jan 02, 2009 2:47 pm

Nice write up kiz. The physics teacher is going to be amazed at how much I now know about electric motors and lipos.
[color=maroon][b]Cool pictures here[/b][/color]
[url=http://www.photobucket.com/savagexldude][img]http://i495.photobucket.com/albums/rr315/savagexldude/flux%20on%20the%20roof%20pics/IMG_1544-1.jpg[/img][/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
y7deluxe
Savage Enthusiast
Savage Enthusiast
Posts: 110
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:00 am

Post by y7deluxe » Fri Jan 02, 2009 2:58 pm

more advantages for electric:
-2 less servos if you count the one you can get rid of with the reverse module
-reverse
-i've never been up north before, but i've heard it's tougher to run nitro up there than in FL. I'd imagine electric would be better in the cold.... dunno though
-if you waterproof the thing, you can do stuff like this:
[youtube]
[/youtube]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
I-Hate-Traxxas
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 1031
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: Currie, MN

Post by I-Hate-Traxxas » Fri Jan 02, 2009 3:19 pm

Very good write up guys will need this!  Good job!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
KiZ
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 5404
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:00 am
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Post by KiZ » Fri Jan 02, 2009 4:20 pm

Thanks for the comments. I added a section on running multiple packs in one vehicle to explain getting desired voltages with dual packs.
[url=http://www.kizzard.net/gallery/][img]http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r56/kizzzard/gray-sav.gif[/img][/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
xtremesavage
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 7267
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: BUCKEYE STATE

Post by xtremesavage » Fri Jan 02, 2009 6:29 pm

I want to know if I have a 2s lipo at 5000mah. ? and a 7.2v nimh ?at 5000 mah ?wouldnt both batteries give me almost the exact same permance ?the 2s at7.4v ? and the 7.2v nimh ? ? ? ?also a 2s at 7.4v ?would an 7 cell nimh at 8.4v out permorme it? ?
I see 10 cell nimh packs at 12v that are a fraction of the price of lipo's. if I can get the same performance out of it, other than size whats the downside?
[img]http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n403/xtremesavage/newsig.png[/img]
Share knowlegde,,,Dont brag!!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
savy411
Savage Enthusiast
Savage Enthusiast
Posts: 164
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 12:00 am
Location: SF Cali

Post by savy411 » Fri Jan 02, 2009 7:23 pm

Electric is way too expensive. My friend spent $250 for his Novak 3.5 setup on his AE tc-5. Two Lipo batteries $100 ea. Charger???

He already burned the ESC , lucky him still under warranty
[img]http://i484.photobucket.com/albums/rr206/xxx411/32JPG-1.jpg[/img]
[color=green][i][b]If it breaks u get to fix it[/b][/i][/color]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
xtremesavage
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 7267
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: BUCKEYE STATE

Post by xtremesavage » Fri Jan 02, 2009 8:32 pm

doesnt the flux only except up to 8 cell nimh's or 3s lipo. I thought I read that somewhere?
[img]http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n403/xtremesavage/newsig.png[/img]
Share knowlegde,,,Dont brag!!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
Trisb
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 1058
Joined: Tue Dec 25, 2007 12:00 am
Location: New jersey
Contact:

Post by Trisb » Fri Jan 02, 2009 9:33 pm

Remember kids, dont let your lipo's  fall below 3v per cell!
Savage, Mini-T, Wheely king, Slash. Too many hop ups to list.

If it isn't broken why not break it?

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

5AVAG3
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 1101
Joined: Fri May 23, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Post by 5AVAG3 » Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:21 am

Excellent info Kiz.
[b][i]MA1N5T....BASH it without boundaries.[/i][/b][img]http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/5158/5avagesignature.jpg[/img]
[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LG1Thz0vqSI]The MA1N5T custom buggy cage in action.[/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
KiZ
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 5404
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:00 am
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Post by KiZ » Sat Jan 03, 2009 7:11 am

[quote="88gtanotchback";p="694494"]wow thanks alot for the write up kiz. ?tons of excellent information i never knew. ?I really appreciate you taking time to do this awesome write up. ?question for you tho. ?whats the life span of a properly treated Lipo battery? ?being that they can be costly to replace i was curious as to what you could expect a lipo to last?[/quote]

Sorry for not answering this yesterday, I think my brain fell out. Lipos do indeed have a limited lifespan. The capacity is the main aspect of the battery that is affect by lifespan, and you'll find after about 200 deep cycles they will have only about half of their capacity left.
It means that you do have to replace the batteries maybe every year or two, depending on how often you run them.

[quote="xtremesavage";p="694566"]I want to know if I have a 2s lipo at 5000mah. ? and a 7.2v nimh ?at 5000 mah ?wouldnt both batteries give me almost the exact same permance ?the 2s at7.4v ? and the 7.2v nimh ? ? ? ?also a 2s at 7.4v ?would an 7 cell nimh at 8.4v out permorme it? ?
I see 10 cell nimh packs at 12v that are a fraction of the price of lipo's. if I can get the same performance out of it, other than size whats the downside?[/quote]

An expensive 7.2v NiMH will perform close to or as well as the level of a 2S LiPo, but the main difference is the discharge and the battery's performance under load. You certainly won't get the same performance from a cheap NiMH battery, and then there is also the weight difference.

I can't tell if you if an 7 cell nimh will outperform a 2S lipo, it probably again depends on the quality of the cells.

You are very right that nimh packs are cheaper than lipo, and thats why I'm going to add information regarding them, don't worry. The main advantage to LiPo right now is getting extreme speed and more capacity for your weight and size.
For example using 2 packs of 8 nimh cells (the max in a flux) will get you 19.2v, compared to 22.2v for 6S lipo.
Another example: nimh cells max out at about 4800mAh. lipo pack capacities are much more flexible because of the cell form. You can have 5000, 6000, 8000 etc packs.

[quote="xtremesavage";p="694581"]doesnt the flux only except up to 8 cell nimh's or 3s lipo. I thought I read that somewhere?[/quote]
The Flux accepts 2 seperate 3S batteries, which is 6S total, because the flux is pre-wired to stack the packs in series. Check out the section in my post about using RCs that use multiple packs.
[url=http://www.kizzard.net/gallery/][img]http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r56/kizzzard/gray-sav.gif[/img][/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
xtremesavage
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 7267
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: BUCKEYE STATE

Post by xtremesavage » Sat Jan 03, 2009 3:18 pm

is the only reason the flux only accepts 8 cell nimh because the battery holder is only so big, so if I mod the battery box I could use up to a 10 cell nimh?   thanx kiz for this write up its all starting to make sense.  I'm getting a flux!
[img]http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n403/xtremesavage/newsig.png[/img]
Share knowlegde,,,Dont brag!!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
KiZ
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 5404
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:00 am
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Post by KiZ » Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:16 pm

Yeah you could probably cut out part of the battery boxes to allow 9 cell packs. The ESC/motor will only take up to 18 cells though, so 9 per pack is the maximum you can use, not 10.
[url=http://www.kizzard.net/gallery/][img]http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r56/kizzzard/gray-sav.gif[/img][/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
88gtanotchback
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 1262
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:00 pm

Post by 88gtanotchback » Sat Jan 03, 2009 7:17 pm

thanks for all the info kiz.  really clearing alot of doubt about brushless up for me.  definitely a newb when it comes to this.  with all this info im assuming you run a brushless?  if so you got any links or vids?

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
KiZ
Site Moderator
Site Moderator
Posts: 5404
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:00 am
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

Post by KiZ » Sun Jan 04, 2009 7:19 am

Yeah I have two brushless w/ lipo cars, an AE rc18t and a Tamiya Dark Impact. I have just bought a Jammin CRT .5 to replace the Dark impact, that will be my spring project!

Image
Image

Here is a vid of my rc18:
[url=http://www.kizzard.net/gallery/][img]http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r56/kizzzard/gray-sav.gif[/img][/url]

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
y7deluxe
Savage Enthusiast
Savage Enthusiast
Posts: 110
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 12:00 am

Post by y7deluxe » Wed Jan 07, 2009 11:06 am

[quote="KiZ";p="694669"]The capacity is the main aspect of the battery that is affect by lifespan, and you'll find after about 200 deep cycles they will have only about half of their capacity left. It means that you do have to replace the batteries maybe every year or two, depending on how often you run them.[/quote]
Go with maxamps.com. They provide a 3-year 300 cycle warranty on their batteries. It's an additional cost that I never pay, but it insures me that the packs will make it that long. So far, for me anyways, they have proven to be the best lipo packs on the market.

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
zooman
Savage Enthusiast
Savage Enthusiast
Posts: 190
Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: Canada

Post by zooman » Sun Jan 11, 2009 4:11 am

Very nice and well put together.
Here's to ya KiZ :D

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

User avatar
xtremesavage
Savage Extraordinaire
Savage Extraordinaire
Posts: 7267
Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:00 pm
Location: BUCKEYE STATE

Post by xtremesavage » Sun Jan 11, 2009 11:27 am

hey KiZ do you have vid of the dark impact? it lokks like its going 100mph sitting still. lol
[img]http://i338.photobucket.com/albums/n403/xtremesavage/newsig.png[/img]
Share knowlegde,,,Dont brag!!

Link:
BBcode:
HTML:
Hide post links
Show post links

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 6 guests